Adult Romance & Contemporary Love: March 2020 Mini Reviews

I’ve actually done a pretty good job of writing full reviews for most of the books I’ve read so far in 2020. I’ll have more reviews coming in the next few weeks as more spring releases coming out, but today I’ll be sharing reviews that fall into slightly different adult fiction categories and are both well-read and much-loved: Christina Lauren’s Roomies and Chanel Cleeton’s Next Year in Havana.

Roomies by Christina Lauren

81Knrobp2wLMy Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

I’ve made it my recent mission to eat up as many Christina Lauren books as possible, which led me to Roomies. I feel like anyone and everyone was reading Roomies back when it came out in 2017, and I felt like it was finally time for me to pick it up! Plus, how could I not further delay a contemporary romance with an Irish male protagonist??

Roomies follows Holland Baker, an aspiring writer who makes too many excuses to stop at the subway station near her apartment to listen to her street-musician crush, Calvin. When Holland’s musical director of an uncle is in desperate need of a lead musician for his hit Broadway show, Holland gets Calvin an audition. The problem? Calvin is in the US illegally, since his student visa expired years ago. The solution? Holland marries the Irishman.

Roomies was such a light-hearted, rom-com journey for Holland and Calvin. While Holland is absolutely head-over-heels for Calvin from the get-go, this book is really about them finding their passion and love for one another. You better believe that the Irish girl that I am absolutely squealed out loud when Calvin gives Holland a gold claddaugh ring. The symbol- love, loyalty, and friendship- sums up their relationship! I also loved the little reminders that Calvin is Irish and has an accent,like  pronouncing “things” like “tings.” The book does take a while to really set the stage (no musical-puns intended) and get the plot going, but I really liked getting to know Holland her life. Yes, the marriage and romance (and yes, the romance scenes towards the end were so good!) are at its heart, but I loved Holland’s uncles and how they act as her support system. Many contemporary romance and Broadway lovers will especially enjoy Roomies’ settings, as it takes place in the NYC theater world. Holland, Calvin, and her uncle, Robert, have such a genuine love for music, and I loved seeing Holland embrace its place in her life even though she isn’t a musician. After finishing Roomies, I basically added all the Christina Lauren books I haven’t yet read to my TBR!Read More »

YA DEBUT & MORE CONTEMPORARY READS: January Mini Reviews

It’s no surprise that contemporary marked the ending of my 2019 reading and the start of my 2020 reading!

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper

My Rating: 3/5 Stars

44281034Phil Stamper’s YA debut novel, The Gravity of Us, was the first 2020 release and first completed book in my new reading year. The book’s unique premise really caught my attention back at Book Expo 2019. The Gravity of Us is narrated by Cal, a Brooklyn-based social media star whose life is upended when his dad is chosen for NASA’s mission to Mars. Cal’s family moves to Texas and lives with this other astronauts’ families, which includes the quiet and attractive Leon. Cal deals with a reality TV show about the space mission, his future living under his dad’s dream, and his mutual attraction to Leon.

The premise of The Gravity of Us really delivered. The whole NASA/Mars mission was very well-done and as somewhat unexpected, the setting was very different than other YA contemporary books. I really liked when Phil Stamper delved into some NASA or space history facts, as Cal’s neighborhood in Texas is a replica of the 1960s and 70s astro-family communities. Much of this has to do with StarWatch, a reality TV show tracking the mission and the lives of the astronauts and their families. I’m still not sure how I feel about the reality TV element. On the one hand, it added another layer of tension, as Cal sees right through the reality show, but on the other hand, it added a lot of unnecessary tension. While I loved reading about the NASA narrative, there was a lot in the StarWatch vs. NASA battle that was hard to follow. The other main element that I unfortunately was not the biggest fan of was Leon and Cal’s chemistry. Cal admires Leon from afar in the beginning, it’s hinted by Leon’s sister that Leon finds Cal attractive too, and all of a sudden, they’re flirting and then they’re somewhat dating??

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Overall, I enjoyed the premise of The Gravity of Us and its space-centric plot that actually had a lot of family development, as Cal and his parents contend with their different dreams and aspirations for their family. Yet, I was not a fan of the book’s writing style and romantic relationship development.

The Gravity of Us comes out on February 4, 2020.

This review is based on an advance uncorrected proof. By no means did receiving this review copy affect my thoughts or opinions.

Meg & Jo by Virginia Kantra

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

megjoIn honor of the new Little Women film, I dove back into the world of one of my favorite classics with Virginia Kantra’s Meg & Jo. Meg & Jo is a modern retelling of the classic, following Jo’s life living as a struggling professional writer and successful food blogger in New York City and Meg’s life being married and raising two children while feeling like she must take care of anything and everything. When the March sisters’ mother becomes ill over the holidays, the four March girls return home for the holidays. Having read this book in December, I loved Meg and Jo’s holiday spirit. This is the perfect kind of holiday reads for readers who may not be looking for books that scream Christmas, but still involve a festive atmospheric or stories where the backdrop is Thanksgiving and Christmas.

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ROMANCE READS & A HYPED FANTASY ENDING: December 2019 Mini Reviews

Romance, especially sports romance, has been the name of most of my reading game in December. I also took a brief break in the romance and contemporary-ness by picking up one of the most anticipated YA fantasy conclusions this month as well.

One Day in December by Josie Silver

My Rating: 5/5 Stars

One Day in December is one of my new favorite holiday reads. I absolutely devoured this book over one weekend in December and highly recommend binge-reading it over your holiday break. One day in December, Laurie falls in love at first sight with a man at bus stop, only never to see him again… until the next Christmas when Laurie’s best friend, Sarah, introduces her to her new boyfriend, Jack.

The book is narrated from Laurie’s third person perspective with a few chapters from Jack’s third person perspective and is told over the course of ten years. I really liked the book’s storytelling, as Josie Silver showed the most important or integral parts in all of the relationships. I also just genuinely enjoyed Josie Silver’s writing style, loving each character’s humor and the balance between plot and getting to know the characters. Each character really evolves and grows up from beginning to end. I really loved being able to follow along with each of their journeys. I wasn’t sure within the first few chapters if I was going to like it or not, but I soon fell into Laurie and Sarah’s friendship and humor. Despite the yes, major fact, that they are in love with the same guy, Sarah and Laurie have such a great female friendship. The whole falling in love with the same guy, not to mention the guy from the bus stop, trope may not be too realistic, but it really worked for this story. You begin to forget that that’s not only how Laurie first “met” Jack, but also Laurie’s feelings for Jack get lost as she begins to explore new relationships and opportunities.

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Although One Day in December wasn’t all Christmas all the time, I still appreciated its holiday spirit. Many of the major events in the book happen during the holiday season, and most of the Christmas scenes were very atmospheric.

I look forward to picking up Josie Silver’s new release in March 2020, The Two Lives of Lydia Bird.

The Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay Adams

My Rating: 5/5 Stars

71tcAuFKRcLMy craving for adult romance latest led me to one of the latest releases of 2019, The Bromance Book Club. The Bromance Book Club follows professional baseball star Gavin’s attempt to save his marriage. His teammates’ strategy? Use romance novels and the relationship development within them as inspiration in getting his wife back.

The Bromance Book Club’s unique premise absolutely delivered! The book really has all the elements, from friendship, family, sports, humor, marriage, raising kids, and sisterhood. Lyssa Kay Adams balances all of these elements in this new favorite rom-com of mine. There are definitely some steamy moments, but the book is really about Gaving rebuilding his relationship with Thea, and Thea learning to find the love and happiness in her marriage again. I think I really am a fan of the third person perspective, with this book alternating between Gavin and Thea’s perspectives. I also loved their relationships with the people in their own lives, with Del and Mack for Gavin and Liv for Thea.

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ROMANCE  & CONTEMPORARY LOVE: Fall Mini Reviews

Monthly mini reviews are hit or miss for me, depending on the amount of books I read and if I have enough thoughts & feels to dedicate entire reviews for them. I read the following three books- a new adult romance from my favorite NA author, an adult romance from a much loved writing duo, and a debut contemporary- in October and November 2019.

The Chase (Briar U #1) by Elle Kennedy 

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

Ever since I read the last book in the Off-Campus series back in May, I have been highly looking forward to starting Elle Kennedy’s spin-off series, Briar U. The series follows new and old characters involved in new relationships in the (hot) hockey playing world that is the fictional Briar University. The Chase follows Summer, the sister of Dean (the male lead in The Score), as she transfers to Briar U after being kicked out of her Ivy league school after a freaky sorority party accident. When she’s not welcome into Briar U’s chapter, Summer finds herself living with three of the Briar U hockey players, including the tattoo-covered, quiet, artistic and video-game designer Colin, otherwise known as Fitz.

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I was so excited when I found out The Chase’s male lead was Fitz because he was one of my favorite secondary characters in Off-Campus. Summer and Fitz definitely have a slow burn romance, as the two spend the majority of the book not being together. I wish their relationship had progressed sooner, in that nothing really happens in the book until their relationship really begins to bloom. However, I loved getting to follow the characters and their everyday. Much of Summer’s everyday follows her life as a fashion major, dealing with a creepy professor, and the struggles that come with her learning disability. Elle Kennedy incorporates a lot of mature themes with #MeToo vibes. Set in his senior year, Fitz finds himself competing for a full time position at a big video game company.

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CONTEMPORARY ROUNDUP: August 2019 Mini Reviews

August was filled with all the contemporary books (as per usual for this book nerd), focusing on a mix of new books, backlist titles, and upcoming 2019 releases.

Say You Still Love Me by K.A. Tucker

My Rating: 3.5/5

download (2)After loving K.A. Tucker’s The Simple Wild back in May, I immediately put her August 2019 release, Say You Still Love Me, on my TBR. Twenty-nine year old Piper works as a VP at her family’s multibillion-dollar release estate development firm, constantly proving her worth in a male-dominated workplace and contending with her ex-finance, another VP. Things at work become crazier for Piper when she runs into her first love from summer camp, Kyle, who apparently doesn’t even remember her name or why he never contacted her again after camp ended.

Say You Still Love Me flips between Piper’s present and her past as a summer camp counselor with Kyle. While I enjoyed this one, I wouldn’t say it brought anything new to the table. Unexpectedly running into your first love after years apart seems to be an increasingly popular trope in the new adult romance world. It’s really not my cup as a reader. I also didn’t see the chemistry between Kyle and Piper both when they were at camp and when they first reunite in the present. The summer camp provided a fun atmosphere to the story, but I was more invested in Piper’s friendships and her day-to-day over the romance. Like The Simple Wild, my favorite parts of Say You Still Love Me were the family dynamics and Piper’s career. Piper has to deal with the pressure and expectations that come with one day taking over the family business (that is if her father ever retires), while coming to terms with the secrets her parents have hidden from her since working at the summer camp. Despite the pressure, she still dominates the workplace. Through Piper, K.A. Tucker packs in great female empowerment.

You’d Be Mine by Erin Hanh

My Rating: 4/5

36146624Erin Hanh’s You’d Be Mine was on my “I have to absolutely read this book in 2019” TBR. You’d Be Mine follows country musicians Clay Coolidge and Annie Mathers on their US summer tour. Despite its seemingly fun setting, You’d Be Mine is the darkest YA contemporary I have read in a while. Both characters deal with the loss of loved ones, as well as drug and alcohol addiction. Clay struggles with drinking after losing someone close to him, while Annie grown up around drugs and alcohol and has lost both of her superstar parents to suicide. Even though its less than 300 pages, it took me some time to adjust to You’d Be Mine. The dual perspective is an ever-present narrative in YA books,. While having both Clay and Annie’s perspectives allows us to get to know both of them, I found myself more invested in Annie’s storyline because she was simply more like-able than Clay.

When it comes to my reading tastes, I have come to the conclusion that I am not the biggest fan of music YA. I don’t mind music-centered stories, but I don’t find myself connecting to them as much as other reader. I find myself skimming, if not completely over, the songs. However, I did want to read You’d Be Mine because I am a country music fan. I really enjoyed the real-life references to country music, such as the CMT Awards and Johnny Cash and June Carter. I liked Annie and Clay’s chemistry together on stage, but I definitely enjoyed their time out of the spotlight more. I recommend You’d Be Mine for fans of Emery Lord’s Open Road Summer, but with the expectation that this book deals with  darker themes similar to Taylor Jenkin Reid’s Daisy Jones and the Six.

Foolish Hearts by Emma Mills

My Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

33275690If you’ve been following my TBR posts, you’ll know that I was both excited and intimidated to read Emma Mills’ Foolish Hearts. This was the last published book of hers I still had to read. Part of my holding off was due to my need to save books by my go-to contemporary authors for mood reads, part also that I was nervous I wouldn’t enjoy this one like so many others. Foolish Hearts is definitely the most loved Emma Mills book, and I’m happy to report that it is now my new favorite book of hers. The book follows Claudia’s happenings after she overhears her school’s it-couple break up at a party. She is forced to work on her school production of Much Ado About Nothing with one of that couple, Iris, along with a very cute and very goofy guy.

I always enjoy reading Emma Mills’ books because of the dialogue and the great relationship dynamics. Her characters and friendships just feel so real. Claudia’s sarcasm and humor is quite similar to my own, which made for an even more relatable read. While she may not believe she is the most confident, she is unafraid to be herself around the tough Iris and the cutie and crush that is Gideon. She’s probably my favorite Emma Mills’ protagonist. From boy bands to online gaming, I really enjoyed the nods to various fandoms. There’s just so much to explore, from friendship to family to romance to class differences. I’ve found that not a lot happens plot wise in Emma Mills’ books, but they make for such great quiet reads. By the end, Claudia really grows as a character in the way she thinks about herself and the relationships she develops with her old and new friends.

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CONTEMPORARY, CONTEMPORARY: July 2019 Mini Reviews

Once again, my monthly mini reviews is filled with contemporary books! What else am I supposed to read in the summer?

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Open Road Summer by Emery Lord

downloadMy Rating: 4/5 Stars

Open Road Summer was the final published Emery Lord book I had left to read. I received the gorgeous UK edition of Emery Lord’s debut novel last summer, but decided to save it until this July because this fangirl loves having summer contemporaries saved for summer reading. Open Road Summer follows Reagan’s summer as she travels the US on tour with her country music star of a best friend, Dee. After a PR nightmare, Reagan’s plans of a summer with her best friend are soon interrupted by Matt Finch, Dee’s opening act.

Open Road Summer is a really solid summer contemporary about friendship and romance. Reagan and Matt’s relationship was sweet, but I was most invested in Dee and Reagan. It was really fun being on the road with Dee and Reagan and I loved getting to explore their friendship. No matter what, Dee and Reagan are there for each other through everything. I loved Dee and her family’s Southern charm and I wouldn’t mind some sort of spin off following her career and romance! On the other hand, while Reagan is a really complex and well developed character, I just couldn’t like her. Like a few other readers, I agree that her cattiness/ her girl-hate was way too melodramatic most of the time. While a lot of her remarks had to do with her feelings for her love interest, she sees a lot of girls as competitors and blatantly put a few of them down for not being as attractive as her or for not being ’Hollywood/celebrity’ attractive.

The Names They Gave Us remains my #1 Emery Lord book and I just love Max from The Start of Me and You way too much, but Open Road Summer definitely has a spot in my summer contemporary loving heart. Contemporary fans looking for books featuring friendship, road trips, and/or music will particularly enjoy this one.

Pretty Guilty Women by Gina LaManna 

My Rating: 5/5 Stars 

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Pretty Guilty Women is the perfect read for beach and binge reading. With comparisons to Big Little Lies, Pretty Guilty Women rewinds the events of a destination wedding week, as four women each confess to the same murder. The book flips between interviews with the case’s lead detective and the four women’s happenings throughout the week. Each women is dealing with some sort of issue, varying levels of seriousness. Lulu is afraid her fifth marriage won’t be her last, as her husband takes phone calls from someone named S while on vacation; Ginger is having trouble connecting with her fifteen year old daughter; while Kate seemingly has all the money in the world, there is one thing she can’t buy that is causing problems with her boyfriend; Emily finds herself unable to escape her past, including the relationship that has haunted her for over ten years and another that destroyed her friendship with Ginger.

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A 2019 FAVORITE & MORE: June Contemporary Mini Reviews

Everyone knows that I love saving contemporaries for the summertime. There’s just something about being transported to a (often summery) realistic place while reading in the pool or on the beach!

The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen

x510 (1) Rating: 5/5 Stars

Like many, Sarah Dessen has always been an integral part of my YA reading life. When I started reading YA in middle school, her books were among the first I dived into. I admit that some of her books, especially the earlier releases, have blurred together for me—I think that calls for a reread spree! However, one thing that is perfectly crystal clear (much like the lake) is that The Rest of the Story is one of my favorite Sarah Dessen books and one of my best 2019 reads. I quickly fell into this book and really couldn’t part from it for long!

 Sarah Dessen’s books always have some sort of family element, but family is at the heart of The Rest of the Story. When her summer plans unexpectedly change, Emma Saylor finds herself staying at her grandmother’s house with her cousins at North Lake (sidenote: while Emma goes by both names, I’m just going to call her Emma for the sake of this review). I just couldn’t get enough of Emma’s family! I think they each had their own charm, while all helping run their grandmother’s lakeside motel. While Emma learns a lot about her mother’s side of the family, she gets to understand more about her mother’s past through their stories and memories. It was a very smart choice for Sarah Dessen to continue the story on beyond Emma’s three weeks for her family, making the story not so predictable and more expansive. There is a touch of romance, but it definitely wasn’t the focus. I’d argue that Emma spends either equal or less time with her romance interest compared to her family. I think Trinity and Gordon, her cousins, were my two favorite secondary characters.

Overall, there was something just so cozy and atmospheric about The Rest of the Story. I think this book is perfect for readers who like books exploring family dynamics and how learning about one’s pasts can help them understand their present- and themselves. Like all of Sarah’s books, The Rest of the Story had the perfect amount of summer contemporary charm. There’s its lakeside setting, romance, family, self-discovery, and much more. Sarah Dessen nicely balanced all these elements to give me one of my favorite summer contemporaries. I really hope she  keeps coming out with more, and her books are definitely worth the wait.

Famous in a Small Town by Emma Mills

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

Emma Mills’ Famous in a Small Town was a must-read on my summer TBR. As true 35526663Fangirl Fury fashion, I put off reading this January 2019 release until the summer because your girl must have summer contemporaries to read during the season. I was nervous going into Famous in a Small Town because a few readers that I follow said that this was their least favorite Emma Mills’ book. As someone who has read two of Emma Mills’ books (This Adventure Ends and First & Then) and has yet to read Foolish Hearts , Famous in a Small Town is currently my second favorite book of hers.

An important element I’ve come to realize when reading Emma Mills’ books is that her stories are much more character-driven than what the synopsis may suggest about the plot. For example, Small Town Hearts’ synopsis revolves around Sophie’s determination to get her high school’s marching band to the upcoming Rose Parade with a little help from her town’s country music star, Megan Pleasant. While Sophie is determined to get Megan to help them, this book is much more about her friend group’s summer before their senior year and all the dynamics and feelings between them. Although the official synopsis does allude to a romance interest for Sophie, this book focused more on that relationship than I would have predicted.

I enjoyed Famous in a Small Town so much because of Sophie, her friends and their realness. While I did want more from the small town star element, I didn’t mind reading about Sophie’s everyday happenings, from her friends’ summer jobs to their billboard-inspired group chats. This is something that I’ve noticed about all the Emma Mills’ books I’ve read, but her characters and their conversations just feel so real. They’re not afraid to make jokes or comments to one another and there is always just such an easiness among them. I do admit though that one of the reasons I did not give this book a full five stars is that Sophie’s best friend, Brit, annoyed me to no end. I think best friends can get away with saying some rather honest things to one another, but some of her comments and actions were just uncalled for (especially considering the reveal about Sophie that I was not expecting until right before it was revealed).

I also wish that this book had a tiny bit less focus on the romance, and I felt that the plot/what the synopsis largely discusses didn’t really come together until the very end. The reveal related to this plot was definitely unexpected for me (which I loved!) and I would have loved some more time to explore that. While I do appreciate Emma Mills’ quiet YA-ness (what I use to describe books that aren’t so much about the plot, but character and relationship development), I admit that I did pick up this book because of its suggested plot. I know it may sound that this book may not sound like a 4.5 star read for me, but I did enjoy it a lot. The book for sure would have been a 5 star read if it had more emphasis on the plot and some changed character direction.

Somewhere Only We Know by Maurene Goo

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

A few people that I follow in the book community didn’t love Somewhere Only We Know36992163._UY986_SS986_ as much as they had hoped, which made me super nervous going into it. I had been not-so patiently waiting for this one to come in from my local library, since I love The Way You Make Me Feel so much. Thankfully, I really enjoyed Somewhere Only We Know. I love the title and hope Maurene Goo’s books keep getting named after song titles. Its Roman Holiday premise completely sold me, and I loved the K-pop star twist and Hong Kong setting. The book follows K-pop star Lucky’s 24 hour Hong Kong adventure and escape from her stressful life in the spotlight with Jack, who works as an undercover tabloid photographer. Obviously this thought does not affect my rating of the book, but I wish it had a better cover! I feel so much could have been done with the Hong Kong setting and Lucky and Jack could have been set up in a less awkward position.

Somewhere Only We Know is overall such fun and atmospheric read that will give you ALL the food cravings. Maurene Goo transports readers to Hong Kong, making me realize that I seriously need some egg waffles and sticky buns in my foodie life. This book is one of the few instances where I was okay with the insta-love because I really enjoyed Lucky and Jack’s chemistry. I think Jack is sort’ve set up to be a not-so nice guy in the very beginning, since he decides to hang out with Lucky just to get photos for the tabloid. Instead, I never thought as Jack as a bad guy because Maurene Goo gives a lot of dimension to his character. Somewhere Only We Know currently falls as my second favorite Maurene Goo book, with The Way You Make Me Feel as first but ahead of I Believe in Thing Called Love.

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Have you read The Rest of the Story, Somewhere Only We Know or Famous in a Small Town? What summer contemporaries have you read this summer? Share in the comments!

CONTEMPORARY HEARTS: May Mini Reviews

Book reviews are among my favorite blog posts to write. However, I sometimes struggle articulating reviews for books that I might’ve really enjoyed, but don’t know what exactly to say about them. I’ve read the following books in April and May, and they include: a book by a much beloved contemporary author, a 2018 release that hasn’t received too much attention, a vey much hyped and loved book, and a VERY current read.

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First & Then by Emma Mills

Rating: 4/5 Stars

After really enjoying This Adventure Ends, I decided to go back and read Emma Mills books in publication order. Not only was I just genuinely excited to pick up her first book, First & Then, but its Friday Night Lights meets Pride and Prejudice premise had me sold at the get-go. You’ll know from my wrap-ups that Friday Night Lights is one of my most recent all-time favorite TV shows that has transformed into a more recent obsession with football documentary series. While I wouldn’t call it Friday Night Lights, I enjoyed First & Then’s football aspect. I thought it was really accessible to readers who may or may not be familiar with the sport.

First & Then is not really a plot-driven story, but rather focuses on relationship growth. Devon is figuring out relationships with many people in her life: her cousin, Foster, who has just moved in with her family; Cas, her best friend, who she’s always had feelings for; Ezra, the star running back, who unexpectedly chooses Devon as his gym class partner. Devon also must do some self-exploration, trying to figure out if she even wants to go to college. I didn’t mind that First & Then is quiet and on the shorter side, but I felt that the plot needed more. Although this book is very much about character and relationship growth, nothing much really eventful happens aside from the formation of Devon’s one relationship. I recommend this book for readers looking for quiet YA or a quick read on a beach or pool day this summer.

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IMG_6321Tell Me No Lies by Adele Griffin

Rating: 4/5 Stars

 I had wanted to read a book by Adele Griffin for a long time. I decided on Tell Me No Lies mostly for its late 1980s backdrop, and yes, its gorgeous cover. Its mixed reviews on Goodreads made me put it off reading it for a little longer than I should have, but I am trying to somewhat prioritize books on my physical/owned TBR. Ultimately, I ended up really enjoying Tell Me No Lies! I really liked Adele Griffin’s writing style, especially for the book’s atmosphere. Our protagonist, Lizzy, rebels from her suburban and over-achiever life during her senior year and explores night life and the art scene in Philadelphia with the new girl in school.

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ALL THE HYPE: January Mini Reviews

The following four books from my twelve total reads of January have received so much hype in the book community that I knew that 1) they deserved off my TBR and into my read pile and 2) needed a mini review from this hype-loving fangirl.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

After getting through the first seventy pages, I really thought I’d be DNF’ing my second book of 2019, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. This 2017 debut has received so much hype beyond the book community and will be adapted into a film by Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine. In these first few chapters, I struggled connecting with Eleanor’s narration and thoughts. A few reviewers that have similar reading tastes to me said that they also struggled in the beginning, but it worth continuing on—and I completely agree!

As Eleanor warms up to Raymond and other people in her life, I was really able to understand her more and see how her tragic past has affected her mindset and lifestyle. This book is truly a tearjerker—I often felt the tears coming on as Eleanor tells Raymond and his mom that they can come over to her apartment whenever they wish. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine may be a hard book for some readers (warnings for physical and mental abuse and mental illness), but it felt like a very honest and real depiction). While I can’t say that I could connect to her throughout, I love where we leave Eleanor in the end and I could potentially see some sort of sequel.

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

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ADULT CONTEMPORARY LOVE: December Mini Reviews

While I am still a YA reader at heart, I’ve been increasingly enjoying adult contemporaries. Below are mini reviews (and a bit jumbled thoughts) for the three adult books that I read in December.

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41xsiJ8NmdL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_China Rich Girlfriend (Crazy Rich Asians #2) by Kevin Kwan

Like many readers, it’s no surprise that I love Kevin Kwan’s Crazy Rich Asians (both book and movie). China Rich Girlfriend was a fun sequel that expanded this extravagant, shopping-spree filled world and gave more insight on particular characters. Kitty and Astrid are my favorites, Kitty for her continued ridiculousness and Astrid for her intelligence and relationships with Charlie and Michael (who I definitely didn’t like). We also spent more time with Nick and Rachel. In addition, I loved the trip to Paris, I actually liked Rachel’s father and that storyline more than expected, and MANY things about the ending left me shocked. I am not so patiently waiting for Rich People Problems to come in from my county library.

My Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

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